We live where we work and we eat what we grow and we want to live long and healthy lives. 

What don't we grow?

  • Corn, melons, and pumpkins. These crops simply require too much land for us to be able to grow them and everything else. So we contract with a couple small Pennsylvania farmers who grow the same way we do - no synthetic chemicals, no GMOs, hand weeding, hand picking, etc. We pick these crops up fresh each morning when they are in-season. 
  • Mushrooms. Our knowledge of growing mushrooms couldn't fill a thimble, let alone a mushroom, so we buy from a Pennsylvania farm with a couple mushroom houses. No worries, we made sure they treat their employees and mushrooms right before doing business with them. 
  • Meat. We do not raise beef, pork, lamb, or chicken for meat. We do not have the land or the setup for that kind of operation. So, again, we contract with a few farmers and commit to buying whole animals. All the animals are on pasture with access to hay and/or grain as the weather demands (it is really hard to survive on mud or snow or dust). The meat is processed at a small USDA-certified slaughterhouse. 

What do we grow?

Vegetables

Asparagus, summer squash, winter squash, lettuce, spinach, red & green & russian & spigarello kale, collard greens, swiss chard, slicing & heirloom & plum & cherry & grape & pear tomatoes, kohlrabi, beets, onions, scallions, radishes, green & yellow & purple beans, sorrel, hull peas, snow peas, snap peas, fava beans, lima beans, potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, peppers, celery, purslane, cucumbers, arugula, mustard greens, okra, rhubarb, brussels sprouts, eggplant, and more. 

Fruits

We have several varieties of red raspberries, black raspberries, amber raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, sweet cherries, pie cherries, apples, pears, asian pears, white & yellow peaches, plums, apricots, plouts, kiwi berries, persimmons, currants, gooseberries, grapes, figs, white & yellow nectarines, paw-paws (note - we are building up our paw-paw patch; give us a couple years to have them in quantity), and probably a few other things I've forgotten. We carry local, pesticide-free honeydew, cantaloupe, and watermelon too. 

Herbs

Anise, basil, oregano, thyme, sage, dill, parsley, cilantro, spearmint & chocolate mint, chives, lavender, rosemary, tarragon, bay leaves, etc.

Cut flowers

We have peonies, snap dragons, asters, dianthus, daisies, sunflowers, zinnias, dahlias, gladiolas, ageratum, tulips, fresias, celosia, straw flowers, gomphrena, carnations, lilacs, cosmos, statice, salvia, baby's breath, gerbera daisies, lilies, roses, and more for our cut flower bouquets.

Eggs

We have a flock of brown egg-laying chickens and a few ducks that supply us with eggs on the property - make sure you stop by and say 'hi' when you visit. 


 

Growing Practices

We use crop rotation, our compost (due to all the paperwork involved, we cannot sell our compost or use yours), our own aged manure (chicken, duck, rabbit, horse, goat), fish emulsion, seaweed, beneficial insects and beneficial nematodes, plant and mineral based sprays and powders for insecticides and fungicides. We use plastic, straw, wood chips, and leaf mulch, and hoeing to suppress weeds; we're trying our hand at using torches for weed control too. We consider air flow in planting distance and pruning. We maintain bee hives to help with pollination (with the side benefit of honey!). We plant with seeds we have saved or from businesses like Johnny's Seeds. We start our own herbs and vegetables in one of our greenhouses. We start our own flowers for the cutting garden.


We do not use sewage sludge, organophosphates, synthetic chemicals, or GMOs. 


Our chickens have a large enclosure where they have 24/7 access to the outside, the inside, the laying boxes (old apple crates filled with straw), the roosts, food, and water. As our planting schedule permits, they are also let out loose to roam the property. We do not EVER force a molt or cull chickens from our flock because they are less productive. Once a chicken enters our flock, they are there till they die of old age. Our chickens do not receive antibiotics or hormones or anything else the egg-laying industry has thought up. The girls love their 2-3 times daily fruits and veggies, along with all the bugs and dirt they scratch up on their own. We currently only have brown egg-layers. 

Highland Orchards

Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 9-5, Closed Sun    1431 Foulk Rd, Wilmington, DE        302-478-4042     highlandcsa@gmail.com

You've never lived until you've tried a local, in-season peach"

~ Kristy